Albert Lee featuring Cindy Cashdollar

ALBERT LEE

Albert Lee was first introduced to music with the piano, taking lessons at age seven, learning the classics and pop tunes until the likes of Jerry Lee Lewis inspired him to take up the guitar.

Albert was treated one Christmas to a Hofner President acoustic arch-top, and from there he never looked back. Spurred on by the recordings of Jimmy Bryant, Buddy Holly and The Crickets, Gene Vincent and The Everly Brothers, Albert left school at sixteen and turned pro, getting regular gigs at the 2 i's Coffee Bar and The Flamingo Club in London - first with Bob Xavier’s band, and then with The Jury. He replaced Jimmy Page in The Crusaders before joining Chris Farlowe and The Thunderbirds in ‘64. He soon found his favoured guitar of choice, the Fender Telecaster, whilst everyone else was playing Gibson Les Pauls and Stratocasters. Albert admitted to feeling like the odd man out as his appreciation for American country artists grew, and he formed the band Country Fever. He began working with Poet & The One Man Band, who later turned into Heads, Hands & Feet when Jerry Donahue and Pat Donaldson (of Country Fever) were replaced by Albert and Chas Hodges. Their self-titled debut album featured the original “Country Boy”, now synonymous with Albert’s trademark picking style. The U.S eventually beckoned, and Albert began doing session work and briefly toured with The Crickets in 1973. He moved to Los Angeles, where he met his idols Phil and Don Everly, and Don invited Albert to play with him and pedal steel legend Buddy Emmons. After working on Don’s second album, Albert left to join Joe Cocker’s band and was replaced by Lindsey Buckingham. Albert’s reputation was growing as he moved to Encino, and met his wife Karen while rehearsing in Santa Barbara with Joe Cocker and his band before they went on the road. He contributed to Cocker’s “Sting Ray” and was then approached by A&M about putting together a solo album. At a pivotal point in his career, Albert was asked by Emmylou Harris to replace James Burton - one of his guitar heroes - who was leaving for Elvis Presley’s band. In 1976 he joined the Hot Band, and his incredible guitar work came to the fore on the “Luxury Liner” LP. Albert released his first solo album “Hiding”, produced by Brian Ahern, which featured perhaps the definite version of “Country Boy” with Emmylou on backing vocals and Ricky Skaggs on fiddle. When he returned to London in 1978 for session recording, Albert met Eric Clapton. He was invited to join his band and played on Clapton’s live album “Just One Night”, which featured Albert on lead vocals for a cover of Mark Knopfler’s “Setting Me Up”. Albert would work with Eric for five years before he left and released his second solo album, the self-titled “Albert Lee” in 1982. Albert fulfilled his boyhood dream to play with the Everly Brothers in 1983 when he acted as a guitarist and musical director for their reunion concert at the Royal Albert Hall. Since then he would regularly tour with the Everlys on and off for 20 years. After two instrumental albums - “Speechless” (1986) and “Gagged But Not Bound” (1987) - steel player Gerry Hogan invited Albert to headline at a festival in Newbury, England - fronting his own band for the very first time, Hogan’s Heroes. As Albert toured with Hogan’s Heroes through the late 80s, he began his long association with Ernie Ball Music Man, who would eventually (through many iterations) produce his signature guitar that he tours and records with today. In 2002 he would join Eric Clapton, Tom Petty, Paul McCartney and other music legends on stage at the Concert for George at the Royal Albert Hall. Albert also recieved a Grammy Award in 2002 for his contribution to “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” featured on “Earl Scruggs and Friends”. He appeared for the first time at Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2007, now an annual appearance, and has toured periodically for the last few years with ex-Stones bassist Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings, performing with Georgie Fame. Joining his hero James Burton, along with the likes of Vince Gill and John Jorgenson, Albert won a Grammy for his performance on Brad Paisley’s instrumental “Cluster Pluck” in 2009.


CINDY CASHDOLLAR

Dobro, steel guitar and lap steel player Cindy Cashdollar's career has taken some surprising twists and turns that have led her to work with many leading artists in various genres; including Ryan Adams, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Dave Alvin, Rod Stewart, Albert Lee, Asleep At The Wheel, Marcia Ball, Jorma Kaukonen, Leon Redbone, BeauSoleil, Daniel Lanois, Redd Volkaert, & Peter Rowan. Cindy's unerring ability to perfectly complement a song or step out with a tasteful, imaginative, and exciting solo - and to do it in so many musical genres - has made her one of the most in-demand musicians on the American roots music scene. Her debut CD, "Slide Show", features guest artists comprising a Who's Who from the landscape of Roots & Americana music. Cindy was inducted into the Texas Steel Guitar Hall Of Fame in 2011 (the first female to be inducted), and The Texas Music Hall Of Fame in 2012 Cindy first heard the unique sliding sound of the Dobro in her hometown of Woodstock, New York where she honed her skills playing with bluegrass legend John Herald, blues great Paul Butterfield, Levon Helm and Rick Danko of The Band, and many others who lived in the small but musically hip Catskill mountain town. Eight years and thousands of miles on the road with the premier western swing group Asleep At The Wheel helped her introduce the classic sounds of the non-pedal steel to enthusiastic audiences worldwide, and brought her five Grammy Awards and opportunities to work with musicians of the caliber of Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton and The Dixie Chicks. In great demand as a teacher, Cindy has given many workshops and produced four instructional DVDs distributed internationally by Homespun Tapes. Her debut CD, Slide Show, featured guest artists comprising a Who's Who of roots music including Sonny Landreth, Marcia Ball, Mike Auldridge, Redd Volkaert, Herb Remington, Jorma Kaukonen, & Steve James.

Whether adding driving leads behind Rod Stewart or Ryan Adams, swinging an instrumental with Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion band, or trading blazing licks with Texas Telecaster master Redd Volkaert, Cindy does it all with grace, imagination, and taste. And, in answer to her most frequently asked question, yes, Cashdollar is a real name.

ALBERT LEE

Albert Lee was first introduced to music with the piano, taking lessons at age seven, learning the classics and pop tunes until the likes of Jerry Lee Lewis inspired him to take up the guitar.

Albert was treated one Christmas to a Hofner President acoustic arch-top, and from there he never looked back. Spurred on by the recordings of Jimmy Bryant, Buddy Holly and The Crickets, Gene Vincent and The Everly Brothers, Albert left school at sixteen and turned pro, getting regular gigs at the 2 i's Coffee Bar and The Flamingo Club in London - first with Bob Xavier’s band, and then with The Jury.

He replaced Jimmy Page in The Crusaders before joining Chris Farlowe and The Thunderbirds in ‘64. He soon found his favoured guitar of choice, the Fender Telecaster, whilst everyone else was playing Gibson Les Pauls and Stratocasters. Albert admitted to feeling like the odd man out as his appreciation for American country artists grew, and he formed the band Country Fever. He began working with Poet & The One Man Band, who later turned into Heads, Hands & Feet when Jerry Donahue and Pat Donaldson (of Country Fever) were replaced by Albert and Chas Hodges. Their self-titled debut album featured the original “Country Boy”, now synonymous with Albert’s trademark picking style. The U.S eventually beckoned, and Albert began doing session work and briefly toured with The Crickets in 1973. He moved to Los Angeles, where he met his idols Phil and Don Everly, and Don invited Albert to play with him and pedal steel legend Buddy Emmons. After working on Don’s second album, Albert left to join Joe Cocker’s band and was replaced by Lindsey Buckingham.

Albert’s reputation was growing as he moved to Encino, and met his wife Karen while rehearsing in Santa Barbara with Joe Cocker and his band before they went on the road. He contributed to Cocker’s “Sting Ray” and was then approached by A&M about putting together a solo album. At a pivotal point in his career, Albert was asked by Emmylou Harris to replace James Burton - one of his guitar heroes - who was leaving for Elvis Presley’s band. In 1976 he joined the Hot Band, and his incredible guitar work came to the fore on the “Luxury Liner” LP. Albert released his first solo album “Hiding”, produced by Brian Ahern, which featured perhaps the definite version of “Country Boy” with Emmylou on backing vocals and Ricky Skaggs on fiddle.

When he returned to London in 1978 for session recording, Albert met Eric Clapton. He was invited to join his band and played on Clapton’s live album “Just One Night”, which featured Albert on lead vocals for a cover of Mark Knopfler’s “Setting Me Up”. Albert would work with Eric for five years before he left and released his second solo album, the self-titled “Albert Lee” in 1982. Albert fulfilled his boyhood dream to play with the Everly Brothers in 1983 when he acted as a guitarist and musical director for their reunion concert at the Royal Albert Hall. Since then he would regularly tour with the Everlys on and off for 20 years. After two instrumental albums - “Speechless” (1986) and “Gagged But Not Bound” (1987) - steel player Gerry Hogan invited Albert to headline at a festival in Newbury, England - fronting his own band for the very first time, Hogan’s Heroes. As Albert toured with Hogan’s Heroes through the late 80s, he began his long association with Ernie Ball Music Man, who would eventually (through many iterations) produce his signature guitar that he tours and records with today. In 2002 he would join Eric Clapton, Tom Petty, Paul McCartney and other music legends on stage at the Concert for George at the Royal Albert Hall. Albert also recieved a Grammy Award in 2002 for his contribution to “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” featured on “Earl Scruggs and Friends”. He appeared for the first time at Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2007, now an annual appearance, and has toured periodically for the last few years with ex-Stones bassist Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings, performing with Georgie Fame.

Joining his hero James Burton, along with the likes of Vince Gill and John Jorgenson, Albert won a Grammy for his performance on Brad Paisley’s instrumental “Cluster Pluck” in 2009.


CINDY CASHDOLLAR

Dobro, steel guitar and lap steel player Cindy Cashdollar's career has taken some surprising twists and turns that have led her to work with many leading artists in various genres; including Ryan Adams, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Dave Alvin, Rod Stewart, Albert Lee, Asleep At The Wheel, Marcia Ball, Jorma Kaukonen, Leon Redbone, BeauSoleil, Daniel Lanois, Redd Volkaert, & Peter Rowan.

Cindy's unerring ability to perfectly complement a song or step out with a tasteful, imaginative, and exciting solo - and to do it in so many musical genres - has made her one of the most in-demand musicians on the American roots music scene. Her debut CD, "Slide Show", features guest artists comprising a Who's Who from the landscape of Roots & Americana music.

Cindy was inducted into the Texas Steel Guitar Hall Of Fame in 2011 (the first female to be inducted), and The Texas Music Hall Of Fame in 2012 Cindy first heard the unique sliding sound of the Dobro in her hometown of Woodstock, New York where she honed her skills playing with bluegrass legend John Herald, blues great Paul Butterfield, Levon Helm and Rick Danko of The Band, and many others who lived in the small but musically hip Catskill mountain town.

Eight years and thousands of miles on the road with the premier western swing group Asleep At The Wheel helped her introduce the classic sounds of the non-pedal steel to enthusiastic audiences worldwide, and brought her five Grammy Awards and opportunities to work with musicians of the caliber of Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton and The Dixie Chicks. In great demand as a teacher, Cindy has given many workshops and produced four instructional DVDs distributed internationally by Homespun Tapes. Her debut CD, Slide Show, featured guest artists comprising a Who's Who of roots music including Sonny Landreth, Marcia Ball, Mike Auldridge, Redd Volkaert, Herb Remington, Jorma Kaukonen, & Steve James.


Whether adding driving leads behind Rod Stewart or Ryan Adams, swinging an instrumental with Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion band, or trading blazing licks with Texas Telecaster master Redd Volkaert, Cindy does it all with grace, imagination, and taste. And, in answer to her most frequently asked question, yes, Cashdollar is a real name.



Doors open at 6:45 pm, music at 8 pm

Free parking

This is an all ages show

Advanced seating reservations highly recommended.

Note: parties of 3 or less may be seated with other parties of 3 or less based on availability.

Text 714-809-6146 for more info

ALBERT LEE

Albert Lee was first introduced to music with the piano, taking lessons at age seven, learning the classics and pop tunes until the likes of Jerry Lee Lewis inspired him to take up the guitar.

Albert was treated one Christmas to a Hofner President acoustic arch-top, and from there he never looked back. Spurred on by the recordings of Jimmy Bryant, Buddy Holly and The Crickets, Gene Vincent and The Everly Brothers, Albert left school at sixteen and turned pro, getting regular gigs at the 2 i's Coffee Bar and The Flamingo Club in London - first with Bob Xavier’s band, and then with The Jury. He replaced Jimmy Page in The Crusaders before joining Chris Farlowe and The Thunderbirds in ‘64. He soon found his favoured guitar of choice, the Fender Telecaster, whilst everyone else was playing Gibson Les Pauls and Stratocasters. Albert admitted to feeling like the odd man out as his appreciation for American country artists grew, and he formed the band Country Fever. He began working with Poet & The One Man Band, who later turned into Heads, Hands & Feet when Jerry Donahue and Pat Donaldson (of Country Fever) were replaced by Albert and Chas Hodges. Their self-titled debut album featured the original “Country Boy”, now synonymous with Albert’s trademark picking style. The U.S eventually beckoned, and Albert began doing session work and briefly toured with The Crickets in 1973. He moved to Los Angeles, where he met his idols Phil and Don Everly, and Don invited Albert to play with him and pedal steel legend Buddy Emmons. After working on Don’s second album, Albert left to join Joe Cocker’s band and was replaced by Lindsey Buckingham. Albert’s reputation was growing as he moved to Encino, and met his wife Karen while rehearsing in Santa Barbara with Joe Cocker and his band before they went on the road. He contributed to Cocker’s “Sting Ray” and was then approached by A&M about putting together a solo album. At a pivotal point in his career, Albert was asked by Emmylou Harris to replace James Burton - one of his guitar heroes - who was leaving for Elvis Presley’s band. In 1976 he joined the Hot Band, and his incredible guitar work came to the fore on the “Luxury Liner” LP. Albert released his first solo album “Hiding”, produced by Brian Ahern, which featured perhaps the definite version of “Country Boy” with Emmylou on backing vocals and Ricky Skaggs on fiddle. When he returned to London in 1978 for session recording, Albert met Eric Clapton. He was invited to join his band and played on Clapton’s live album “Just One Night”, which featured Albert on lead vocals for a cover of Mark Knopfler’s “Setting Me Up”. Albert would work with Eric for five years before he left and released his second solo album, the self-titled “Albert Lee” in 1982. Albert fulfilled his boyhood dream to play with the Everly Brothers in 1983 when he acted as a guitarist and musical director for their reunion concert at the Royal Albert Hall. Since then he would regularly tour with the Everlys on and off for 20 years. After two instrumental albums - “Speechless” (1986) and “Gagged But Not Bound” (1987) - steel player Gerry Hogan invited Albert to headline at a festival in Newbury, England - fronting his own band for the very first time, Hogan’s Heroes. As Albert toured with Hogan’s Heroes through the late 80s, he began his long association with Ernie Ball Music Man, who would eventually (through many iterations) produce his signature guitar that he tours and records with today. In 2002 he would join Eric Clapton, Tom Petty, Paul McCartney and other music legends on stage at the Concert for George at the Royal Albert Hall. Albert also recieved a Grammy Award in 2002 for his contribution to “Foggy Mountain Breakdown” featured on “Earl Scruggs and Friends”. He appeared for the first time at Clapton’s Crossroads Guitar Festival in 2007, now an annual appearance, and has toured periodically for the last few years with ex-Stones bassist Bill Wyman’s Rhythm Kings, performing with Georgie Fame. Joining his hero James Burton, along with the likes of Vince Gill and John Jorgenson, Albert won a Grammy for his performance on Brad Paisley’s instrumental “Cluster Pluck” in 2009.


CINDY CASHDOLLAR

Dobro, steel guitar and lap steel player Cindy Cashdollar's career has taken some surprising twists and turns that have led her to work with many leading artists in various genres; including Ryan Adams, Bob Dylan, Van Morrison, Dave Alvin, Rod Stewart, Albert Lee, Asleep At The Wheel, Marcia Ball, Jorma Kaukonen, Leon Redbone, BeauSoleil, Daniel Lanois, Redd Volkaert, & Peter Rowan. Cindy's unerring ability to perfectly complement a song or step out with a tasteful, imaginative, and exciting solo - and to do it in so many musical genres - has made her one of the most in-demand musicians on the American roots music scene. Her debut CD, "Slide Show", features guest artists comprising a Who's Who from the landscape of Roots & Americana music. Cindy was inducted into the Texas Steel Guitar Hall Of Fame in 2011 (the first female to be inducted), and The Texas Music Hall Of Fame in 2012 Cindy first heard the unique sliding sound of the Dobro in her hometown of Woodstock, New York where she honed her skills playing with bluegrass legend John Herald, blues great Paul Butterfield, Levon Helm and Rick Danko of The Band, and many others who lived in the small but musically hip Catskill mountain town. Eight years and thousands of miles on the road with the premier western swing group Asleep At The Wheel helped her introduce the classic sounds of the non-pedal steel to enthusiastic audiences worldwide, and brought her five Grammy Awards and opportunities to work with musicians of the caliber of Willie Nelson, Merle Haggard, Dolly Parton and The Dixie Chicks. In great demand as a teacher, Cindy has given many workshops and produced four instructional DVDs distributed internationally by Homespun Tapes. Her debut CD, Slide Show, featured guest artists comprising a Who's Who of roots music including Sonny Landreth, Marcia Ball, Mike Auldridge, Redd Volkaert, Herb Remington, Jorma Kaukonen, & Steve James.

Whether adding driving leads behind Rod Stewart or Ryan Adams, swinging an instrumental with Garrison Keillor's Prairie Home Companion band, or trading blazing licks with Texas Telecaster master Redd Volkaert, Cindy does it all with grace, imagination, and taste. And, in answer to her most frequently asked question, yes, Cashdollar is a real name.

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