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Alice Wallace: LUCK

Alice Wallace: LUCK

Americana singer-songwriter Alice Wallace is always in Luck.

Luck - as in Luck, Texas.

Luck - as in being able to explore fresh musical terrain on striking self-penned material inspired by compelling emotional and geographical compass points.

“Luck, Texas” was inspired by a trip Wallace and her band made to Texas in March 2015, when they booked several dates in the state around the South By Southwest music festival. One was at Poodie’s Roadhouse, a venue opened by Willie Nelson’s road manager, the late Poodie Locke, near the town of Luck, where Willie makes his home.

“It’s one of those places where you walk in and you say, ‘OK, we’re in Texas,’” Wallace says. “It’s a honky-tonk place with a bunch of regulars sitting at the bar. One of them proposed to me as soon as I walked in. The song is filled with snippets about our adventures on the road. I purposely tried it to make it a song that mimicked the style of Willie Nelson, because he’s certainly been a big influence on me over the years.”

Wallace, whose powerful, elastic singing and melodic, literate song-crafting skill earned her the title of Best Country/Americana Artist from the LA Music Critic Awards in 2016 took up the guitar at 10 and returned to music in earnest at 15.

Wallace absorbed a variety of influences: parental favorites like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris; ‘80s and ‘90s country performers such as Dwight Yoakam, Patty Loveless, and Mary Chapin Carpenter; and singer-songwriters like Jewel, Alanis Morisette and Sarah McLachlan. She says of the latter musicians, “That’s why I picked up the guitar again and made a more serious attempt at playing and writing songs – I was so inspired by hearing female artists on the radio.”

Since then, Wallace’s musical tastes have gravitated toward the modern Americana scene with strong influence from artists like Patty Griffin, Lucinda Williams and Jason Isbell, while also exploring more and more the sounds of 50s and 60s country from artists ranging from Patsy Cline to Willie Nelson.

Fans of Alice Wallace - and those bound to become fans - know it is her voice as much as her lyrics that make this talented artist sought after both at home and on the road. Some of her best material is drawn from relationships that developed on the road. She says, “Traveling full-time does not lend itself well to romantic relationships; the few that I’ve had have been temporary, and usually they end badly. They make for good songwriting material, but I definitely look back and say, ‘All right, Alice, you should have seen that coming.’”

Ray Wylie Hubbard says this about Alice Wallace: "She's stunning, and McQueen 'The Cincinnati Kid' cool."

Concert HOTLINE (714) 809-6146 Text

Americana singer-songwriter Alice Wallace is always in Luck.

Luck - as in Luck, Texas.

Luck - as in being able to explore fresh musical terrain on striking self-penned material inspired by compelling emotional and geographical compass points.

“Luck, Texas” was inspired by a trip Wallace and her band made to Texas in March 2015, when they booked several dates in the state around the South By Southwest music festival. One was at Poodie’s Roadhouse, a venue opened by Willie Nelson’s road manager, the late Poodie Locke, near the town of Luck, where Willie makes his home.

“It’s one of those places where you walk in and you say, ‘OK, we’re in Texas,’” Wallace says. “It’s a honky-tonk place with a bunch of regulars sitting at the bar. One of them proposed to me as soon as I walked in. The song is filled with snippets about our adventures on the road. I purposely tried it to make it a song that mimicked the style of Willie Nelson, because he’s certainly been a big influence on me over the years.”

Wallace, whose powerful, elastic singing and melodic, literate song-crafting skill earned her the title of Best Country/Americana Artist from the LA Music Critic Awards in 2016 took up the guitar at 10 and returned to music in earnest at 15.

Wallace absorbed a variety of influences: parental favorites like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris; ‘80s and ‘90s country performers such as Dwight Yoakam, Patty Loveless, and Mary Chapin Carpenter; and singer-songwriters like Jewel, Alanis Morisette and Sarah McLachlan. She says of the latter musicians, “That’s why I picked up the guitar again and made a more serious attempt at playing and writing songs – I was so inspired by hearing female artists on the radio.”

Since then, Wallace’s musical tastes have gravitated toward the modern Americana scene with strong influence from artists like Patty Griffin, Lucinda Williams and Jason Isbell, while also exploring more and more the sounds of 50s and 60s country from artists ranging from Patsy Cline to Willie Nelson.

Fans of Alice Wallace - and those bound to become fans - know it is her voice as much as her lyrics that make this talented artist sought after both at home and on the road. Some of her best material is drawn from relationships that developed on the road. She says, “Traveling full-time does not lend itself well to romantic relationships; the few that I’ve had have been temporary, and usually they end badly. They make for good songwriting material, but I definitely look back and say, ‘All right, Alice, you should have seen that coming.’”

Ray Wylie Hubbard says this about Alice Wallace: "She's stunning, and McQueen 'The Cincinnati Kid' cool."

Doors open at 6:45 pm, music at 8:15

Free self-parking

This is an all ages show

Advanced seating reservations highly recommended.

Note: parties of 3 or less may be seated with other parties of 3 or less based on availability.

Text 714-809-6146 for more info

Americana singer-songwriter Alice Wallace is always in Luck.

Luck - as in Luck, Texas.

Luck - as in being able to explore fresh musical terrain on striking self-penned material inspired by compelling emotional and geographical compass points.

“Luck, Texas” was inspired by a trip Wallace and her band made to Texas in March 2015, when they booked several dates in the state around the South By Southwest music festival. One was at Poodie’s Roadhouse, a venue opened by Willie Nelson’s road manager, the late Poodie Locke, near the town of Luck, where Willie makes his home.

“It’s one of those places where you walk in and you say, ‘OK, we’re in Texas,’” Wallace says. “It’s a honky-tonk place with a bunch of regulars sitting at the bar. One of them proposed to me as soon as I walked in. The song is filled with snippets about our adventures on the road. I purposely tried it to make it a song that mimicked the style of Willie Nelson, because he’s certainly been a big influence on me over the years.”

Wallace, whose powerful, elastic singing and melodic, literate song-crafting skill earned her the title of Best Country/Americana Artist from the LA Music Critic Awards in 2016 took up the guitar at 10 and returned to music in earnest at 15.

Wallace absorbed a variety of influences: parental favorites like Gram Parsons and Emmylou Harris; ‘80s and ‘90s country performers such as Dwight Yoakam, Patty Loveless, and Mary Chapin Carpenter; and singer-songwriters like Jewel, Alanis Morisette and Sarah McLachlan. She says of the latter musicians, “That’s why I picked up the guitar again and made a more serious attempt at playing and writing songs – I was so inspired by hearing female artists on the radio.”

Since then, Wallace’s musical tastes have gravitated toward the modern Americana scene with strong influence from artists like Patty Griffin, Lucinda Williams and Jason Isbell, while also exploring more and more the sounds of 50s and 60s country from artists ranging from Patsy Cline to Willie Nelson.

Fans of Alice Wallace - and those bound to become fans - know it is her voice as much as her lyrics that make this talented artist sought after both at home and on the road. Some of her best material is drawn from relationships that developed on the road. She says, “Traveling full-time does not lend itself well to romantic relationships; the few that I’ve had have been temporary, and usually they end badly. They make for good songwriting material, but I definitely look back and say, ‘All right, Alice, you should have seen that coming.’”

Ray Wylie Hubbard says this about Alice Wallace: "She's stunning, and McQueen 'The Cincinnati Kid' cool."